Mar
28
What to Eat For Better Sleep
By Anne Danahy MS RDN

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A good night’s sleep is something most people take for granted — until it stops happening. Diet and lifestyle play a more prominent role in sleep than many people are aware. Often a few changes here and there can keep you from tossing and turning or asking for sleeping medication.

Adults require at least seven hours of sleep each night for good health and well-being. Unfortunately, at least one-third of adults have insomnia and regularly get less than that, notes the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (1). Insomnia is defined as:

• Having trouble falling asleep

• Waking frequently during the night

• Waking too early and not being able to fall back asleep

• Having...


Mar
02
Curious About Integrative Nutrition? Courses and Resources to Expand Your Knowledge
By Anne Danahy MS RDN

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Integrative and functional medicine treats the patient as a whole – and many who work in the field are convinced this is the future of medicine. The goal is to understand why the patient is ill, and work to fix the root cause, rather than just prescribe a medication to manage their disease.

Similarly, integrative and functional nutrition is a more personalized approach in which a dietitian and patient partner together to heal the root causes of symptoms or an illness. It’s still science-based, but it considers all aspects of a patient’s lifestyle, genetics, and biochemistry, rather than just prescribing a standard diet for their disease.

Using an integrative and function...


Feb
09
National Nutrition Month RD Resources
By Lisa Andrews Med RD LD

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Unless you’ve got your head in the sand, you’re well aware that the most important month for nutrition professionals is right around the corner. That’s right! National Nutrition Month is less than 4 weeks away!

With the recent release of the 2020 US Dietary Guidelines, this year’s theme is all about “personalizing your plate”. As dietetics professionals, it’s our job to help our clients meet their unique nutritional needs on their terms. Gone are the days of simply handing someone a pre-printed list of suggested foods to eat. What good does that do anyone?

Our national Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) has lots of great resources to help you bri...


Jan
26
What's New in the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines?
By Anne Danahy MS RDN

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The U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently released the latest edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. These science-based recommendations provide guidance about what and how much to eat to meet nutrient needs for health, and to prevent chronic disease.

Although each version of the Dietary Guidelines adheres to a consistent message of healthy eating, the details in that message do evolve. As such, they’re updated every five years, to account for the latest nutrition research, recommendations from science advisors, and diet trends or attitudes among consumers.

Here’s a look at the major highlights of the 2020-2025 Die...


Jan
05
On Our Plates in 2021
By Lisa Andrews Med RD LD

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Most of us can’t wait to kiss 2020 good-bye. In addition to a new year, we’re ready to embrace some new food trends. While we welcomed sour dough and banana bread back into our lives in 2020, some tempting taste twists await us in 2021.

For starters, big breakfasts are back. Gone are the days of grabbing a granola bar and running out the door. While more people will continue to make their living from their living room, breakfast has gotten more focus. Egg white wraps and some made from cheese are popular items on the menu for the low carb folks while whole grain pancakes will also make the plate.

Deja brew. Coffee’s not just comfort in a cup. It’s moving into yogurt, g...


Oct
13
Health Literacy Month
By Lisa Andrews Med RD LD

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Most dietitians cringe when they hear that their patients were handed a piece of paper about their diet and diagnosis. As dietitians, we are trained to “get the back story” on a person’s culture, budget, food preferences, dietary intolerances and allergies, cooking skills, access to food and what equipment they have or don’t have at home to use.

Dietitians are uniquely poised to provide accurate, comprehendible diet, nutrition, and health information given our training in motivational interviewing, role playing, and counseling. Many dietitians are authors, professors, freelance writers, and teachers. Getting our words out in understandable terms is vital to our clien...


Sep
08
What New Food is in Your Food?
By Lisa Andrews Med RD LD

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Food trends come and go. One year, kale is the latest food in the culinary spotlight, being added to smoothies, salads and sold as chips. The next, avocados are America’s sweetheart. While both of these super foods are still in style and highly sought after, a few other ingredients and trends are making their way to your local grocery. Here’s a review of the top 5 latest food trends to look out for.

1. Pea protein- Americans are becoming increasingly concerned about their health and the health of the environment, which is a good thing. As we move away from animal-based products, plant-based proteins remain popular. Pea protein, made from yellow peas, may be found in anything fro...


Aug
17
How to Start a Food or Nutrition Blog
By Anne Danahy MS RDN

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Have you ever considered starting a food or nutrition blog? It’s easier than you might think, and if you commit some time, energy, and a little bit of money, it can pay off in many ways.

Why Start a Food or Nutrition Blog?

A food or nutrition blog gives you a much bigger platform to share your knowledge and inspire people to eat better. Instead of talking to one patient at a time, or a small group of people about one specific topic, a blog can reach thousands of readers a month. There’s something exciting and satisfying in knowing you have readers not just where you live or work, but also all over the world.

Blogging is also a great way to develop and share your knowledge in an a...


Apr
07
COVID-19 and Minority Health
By Lisa Andrews Med RD LD

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With all that’s going on in the world with COVID-19, it’s natural to focus on our own immediate circles of loved ones. Kids are out of school, spouses are working from home or not working at all. Parents or grandparents are isolated and we’re not able to visit them. Fear and anxiety are common right now, and rightfully so. According to the CDC, the US has seen nearly 350,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 10,000 deaths. 1 This pandemic will indeed change the world as we know it. April is Minority Health Month. It’s a perfect time to address an imminent concern for minority populations.

While we are all potentially susceptible to this deadly virus, it’s important ...


Feb
25
Low FODMAP Diet 101
By Anne Danahy MS RDN

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The low FODMAP diet has gained much attention as a way to help manage symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It can be difficult to navigate at first, but for patients who work with a dietitian to implement it, the results can be life changing. Here’s what you should know about this diet, and how to help your patients get started.

What Are FODMAPs?

FODMAP is an acronym for fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols. They’re different types of small chain carbohydrates that in some people, may be poorly absorbed in the small intestine. They draw water into the gut, and they’re rapidly fermented by bacteria in the large intestine. This increases symptoms like ...